FTGS Global Voices Seminar Series:

Bodily subjections, sovereignty as excess: investigating mechanisms of power in Brazilian society (25 January 2023, 2 pm-3 pm UK time)

Registration: Link to the Registration

Chair: Dr Amanda Chisholm, Senior Lecturer in Security Studies / Researcher in Gender and Security at King’s College London 

Speaker: Amanda Álvares Ferreira, PhD candidate at Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro and Associate Professor at Instituto Brasileiro de Ensino, Desenvolvimento e Pesquisa, in Brasília.

Discussant: Professor Anna M Agathangelou, Department of Politics, York University. Professor Agathangelou teaches in the areas of international relations and women and politics. 

FTSG seminar

Amanda Álvares Ferreira analyses the reproduction of the discourse on sovereignty in International Relations as a mechanism of fixation of bodily identity, in line with Judith Butler’s and Michel Foucault’s body of work.

By looking at the politics of death in the Brazilian context, Amanda Álvares Ferreira explores the intersections of race and gender as investments that demarcate abjection and constitute a specific necropolitical practice (the use of social and political power to dictate how some people may live and how some must die) that are characteristic and derivative of its colonisation process.

Most importantly, the contribution in this work is to provide an alternative focus on sovereignty as adopted by Lauren Berlant and Georges Bataille, where agency invested in a rational and decision-making subject is contested once sovereignty is proposed as product of a moment, and of excess. As an attempt to expand queer theory’s questioning of identity politics, Ferreira investigates how a bataillan perspective on sovereignty can help us understand the limits of agency in terms of identities; considering their normalisation as a constant reframing of individuation in the productive terms of modernity.

Amanda Álvares Ferreira

About the speaker 

Amanda Álvares Ferreira is PhD candidate at Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, and master by the same institution. She is currently working as Associate Professor at Instituto Brasileiro de Ensino, Desenvolvimento e Pesquisa, in Brasília.

Her current research is focused on queer and cuir theories and decolonial feminisms in IR, with a special focus in Latin America, and she has also conducted research on prostitution and sex trafficking in Brazil. Amanda has recently published an article at the journal Contexto Internacional, where she discussed lesbian activism in Brazil, at the occasion of the celebration of Stonewall’s 50th anniversary.

FTGS Global Voices Seminar Series

This event is part of the Feminist Theory and Gender Studies (FTGS) Global Voices Seminar Series. 

At this event

Amanda Chisholm

Amanda Chisholm

Senior Lecturer in Security Studies / Researcher in Gender and Security

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Feminist Theory and Gender Studies Global Voices Seminar Series: Upcoming Events 2023 (Jan-Feb)

This series aims to bring a global conversation within and beyond our community members on issues pertaining to feminism, gender, and international relations. 

It is designed to showcase and amplify the expertise and research of Feminist Theory and Gender Studies (FTGS) members as well as foster a larger global community of those with like-minded interests.  We are particularly interested in representation from members of marginalised backgrounds, from the global South and who experience institutional barriers in disseminated their research. 

Link: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/events/series/feminist-theory-and-gender-studies-global-voices-seminar-series-1

FTGS Global Voices Seminar Series

25 Jan

Protest illustration

Bodily subjections, sovereignty as excess: investigating mechanisms of power in Brazilian society

25 January 2023, 14:00 to 15:00

Amanda Álvares Ferreira analyses the reproduction of the discourse on sovereignty in International…

15 Feb

Refugee Camp india_

Shame, Honour and Gender: Tamil women in Devakottai Refugee camp

15 February 2023, 14:00 to 15:00

Part of the Feminist Theory and Gender Studies (FTGS) Global Voices Seminar Series. Sudha Rawat…

22 Feb

Protest

Marta Vergara and the struggle for equal nationality rights at the League of Nations

22 February 2023, 14:00 to 15:00

Natali Cinelli Moreira will discuss how Global South actors have historically brought plural…

Call for FTGS 2023 Executive Committee Nominations

Feminist Theory and Gender Studies Executive Committee

Call for Nominations 2023

FTGS invites nominations for the following positions on the Executive Committee:

  • 2023-25 Section Chair (one position but open to job share) **two year position to replace current incoming chairs and to start as acting Chair in April 2023
  • 2023-26 Section Chair (one position but open to job share)
  • 2023-26 Program Chair (one position but open to job share)
  • 2023-25 Members-at-Large (three positions)
  • 2023-24 Graduate Student Member (two positions)
  • 2023-25 Communication Officer (one position but open to job share)

How to nominate:

  • Each nomination requires one lead nominator & two “seconders”, all members of ISA at the time of nomination.
  • Self-nominations will be accepted, but please provide names of seconders if possible
  • Nominees need not be members of ISA but must take out membership if elected.
  • Please nominate using the form below. EITHER the lead nominator OR the nominee may complete and submit this form.
  • Submit ONE form for each nomination, by email, to the chair of the nomination committee, Maria Tanyag, on maria.tanyag@anu.edu.au.  
  • The deadline for receipt of nominations is 20 December 2022.
  • Please nominate using the form by 20 December 2022.

Please provide the following information:

FOR THE 3 NOMINATORS

(1)        Name

(2)        Affiliation

(3)        Full contact details

 FOR THE NOMINEES

(1)        Position nominated for

(2)        Name, affiliation, & contact details

(3)        200-word bio for FTGS website

Responsibilities for each role: During their tenure, all FTGS Elected officials are required to take part in executive committee meetings at the annual ISA conventions, along with associated email communications and administrative activities. The tasks of the program chair, the section chair, and member-at-large also include the following role-specific responsibilities:

SECTION CHAIR (1-year term officially, effectively 3 years as incoming & outgoing too)

  • Maintain communication with ISA
  • Fundraise for section reception
  • Populate & advise standing committees
  • Respond to section initiatives
  • Respond to ISA initiatives
  • Initiate FTGS policy and projects
  • Maintain records of all FTGS business
  • Preside at annual business meeting
  • Convene FTGS executive committee
  • Serve as section’s spokesperson

PROGRAM CHAIR (1-year term officially, effectively 3 years as incoming & outgoing too)

  • Attend ISA meeting prior to term
  • Write FTGS call for papers
  • Organize FTGS panels of interest
  • Receive FTGS submissions
  • Organize paper submissions into

panels

  • Recruit chairs & discussants for panels
  • Acquire co-sponsorship for panels
  • Complete panel & poster forms
  • Receive & edit preliminary list of panels
  • Edit schedule of panels
  • Replace chairs & discussants who  

withdraw up until ISA conference

  • Support panels at ISA conference
  • Continual email availability May-July

GRADUATE STUDENT MEMBER (1-year term)

  • Engage in at least one of the FTGS section committees.

MEMBER-AT-LARGE (2-year term)

  • Engage in at least one of the FTGS section committees.

COMMUNICATION OFFICER (2-year term)

  • Promote FTGS activities on social media and online platforms
  • Maintain FTGS website
  • Dispensing announcements/calls via social media and online platforms

FTGS Global Voices Seminar Series: ‘Fictions of Autism in / as International Relations’ (21 September 2022, 2 pm-3 pm UK time)

Registration: Link to registration

Chair: Dr Amanda Chisholm, Senior Lecturer in Security Studies / Researcher in Gender and Security at King’s College London 

Speaker: Julio César Díaz Calderón, Ph.D. Student at the University of Florida

Discussant: Alison Howell, Associate Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University

Autism has appeared in International Relations (IR) mostly as discourses that use widespread stereotypes. They attach ideas that autistic subjects (from people to States) are ‘abnormal’ or ‘diseased’ and thus, in need of treatment for a ‘normal’ and ‘healthy’ behaviour useful for the well-being of societies.

As a response, this discussion will explore the relations between dehumanising uses of autism and body metaphors in academic/scientific texts, and alternative narratives about autism in (literary) texts, studying representational power, disruptive potentiality, and analytical insight of autism, disabilities, and bodies.

The talk will expand on previous understandings of fiction in IR and Fictional IR by undoing the relations between the concepts of fiction-imagination-discipline-autism-first-person narration. As creative contributions and as exemplifications of another type of narratives of autism across international borders, it will present three (post)/(de)colonial queer/feminist crip/tullido original fictions (a poem and two narratives) inviting thinking about fictions of autism moving in/through/to classrooms in different locations (disciplines, North/South divides, material/representational constraints, dis-able/too able/un-ableable narratives, love/hate/hope/hopelessness affections) and about ethical dilemmas and alternatives for when institutions and people are asked, are forced, or want to teach Autistic subjects or subjects that perform autistic behaviour.

About the speaker 

Julio César Díaz Calderón

Julio César Díaz Calderón are a Ph.D. Student at the University of Florida where they held a Fulbright-García Robles Fellowship. They won the Alonso Lujambio Political Essay Contest 2017 with the research entitled “Queer Diplomacy and National Indecision: The Federal Executive Actions on Sexual Diversity in Mexico”. They have published in different peer-reviewed journals and books such as Millennium: Journal of International StudiesCritical Studies on SecurityForo InternacionalRevista Interdisciplinaria de Estudios de Género de El Colegio de México. Currently, they are working on two book manuscripts: “(Violent) International Relations (Violence) and Transformative Aest-Ethics” and “Autism and International Relations: From International Security/Development to Fiction and Back.”

At this event

Amanda Chisholm

Amanda Chisholm

Senior Lecturer in Security Studies / Researcher in Gender and Security

FTGS Global Voices Seminar: ‘Beyond the ‘jihadi bride’: Re-conceptualising our approaches to agency’ (14 September 2022, 2 pm-3 pm UK time)

Chair: Dr Amanda Chisholm, Senior Lecturer in Security Studies / Researcher in Gender and Security

Registration: Link to Registration

Speaker: Sarah Gharib Seif, doctoral researcher at the University of St Andrews

Discussant: Professor Caron Gentry, Pro Vice-Chancellor for the Faculty of Arts, Design, and Social Sciences at Northumbria University

In 2015, the ‘phenomenon’ of women traveling to join the Islamic State seemed to have taken over the news, with regular mentions of disbelief of why they would decide to leave their ‘ideal’ Western lives to join a ‘barbaric’ terrorist group. Various attempts to engage with the roles these women have played (and media coverage of it) has focused on a shallow interpretation of agency, and depictions thereof.

Moreover, much of the existing literature on women involved in terrorism not only focuses on the personal, but it treats the women themselves as the challenge for the existing parameters and policies set by the state, whilst simultaneously avoiding how these policies are inherently gendered. Feminist security studies has argued against the dismissal of women using gendered language which erases their agency. However, this still exists within the shallow binary of “having” agency.

Using the case study of the UK government and media narratives of the women who joined IS, and building on postcolonial and decolonial feminist theorisations, this talk  aims to uncover the racialised and gendered nature of these narratives and to take a step towards a deeper conceptualisation of agency.

About the speaker

Sarah Seif

Sarah Gharib Seif’s doctoral research focuses on the (re)production and perpetuation of colonial, racialised and gendered constructions of women who joined the Islamic State through media and government narratives in the Anglosphere, with a particular focus on the United Kingdom.

Sarah’s research interests include postcolonial, decolonial and feminist approaches to International Relations, critical approaches to terrorism, the politics and creation of narratives and discourses, the intersections of gender, race and religion, and the colonial nature of citizenship. Sarah received her undergraduate degree in International Relations from the University of St Andrews and holds an M.A. in International Peace and Security from King’s College London.

She previously worked as a researcher on Preventing Radicalisation and Extremism Leading to Terrorism at the Cairo International Center for Conflict Resolution, Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding (CCCPA), with a focus on the intersections of gender and terrorism, and of DDR and counterterrorism. She also previously worked as a geopolitics and social media intelligence analyst.

FTGS Global Voices Seminar Series

This event is part of the Feminist Theory and Gender Studies (FTGS) Global Voices Seminar Series. 

FTGS Global Voices Seminar: ‘Dying to Serve, Militarism, Affect, and the Politics of Sacrifice’ (27 July 2022, 2 pm-3 pm UK time)

Registration: Link to Registration

Speaker: Dr Maria Rashid, post-doctoral scholar at the UCL Social Research Institute at University College London

Discussant: Dr Amanda Chisholm, Senior Lecturer in Security Studies / Researcher in Gender and Security

Militarism penetrates social structures, relations, and practices including popular culture, modes of economic production, and hierarchies of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Maria Rashid’s book Dying to Serve, Militarism, Affect, and the Politics of Sacrifice in the Pakistan Army, traces this process of infection outward by affixing its gaze on to the military as an institution, the affective bonds it cultivates with soldiers and their families, and the function of these relationships in fashioning the appeal and presence of militarism in modern society.  Saturated with tropes of honour, nation and gender, military deaths are political instances that attach meaning to private grief to produce a public politics of service and sacrifice for the nation-state.

The Pakistan Military invested heavily in crafted rituals for mourning dead soldiers as soldier casualties and the clamour against ‘America’s war’ mounted during the military operations in the ‘War on Terror.’ Through an ethnographic exploration of soldier death in military commemorative ceremonies and its reception in ‘martial’ villages in Punjab, this talk will explore the gap between everyday experiences of families that mourn their dead in rural Pakistan and the idealized image of the martyr that saturates national representations. Positioning dead body politics and ritualistic mourning as technologies of rule, through a focus on subjectivity, intimacy and affect, the talk will explicate the persuasive powers through which hegemonic institutions seek to produce consensus and ideological conformity. 

About the speaker 

Maria Rashid

Dr Maria Rashid completed her doctorate from the School of Oriental and African Studies in Politics and International Studies in 2018. 

Her book Dying to Serve, Militarism, Affect and the Politics of Sacrifice was published in 2020 by Stanford University Press and has been awarded the Bernard S. Cohn 2022 prize and was shortlisted for the IPS- International Political Sociology Book Award, 2021 and the British South Asian Studies 2022 book prize.

Maria is also a psychologist by training and has worked with various national and international non-governmental organizations in Pakistan for overtwenty years. She is currently a post-doctoral scholar at the UCL Social Research Institute at University College London, UK and is involved in training and research around violence, gender and militarism.

FTGS Global Voices Seminar Series

This event is part of the Feminist Theory and Gender Studies (FTGS) Global Voices Seminar Series.

At this event

Amanda Chisholm

Amanda Chisholm

Senior Lecturer in Security Studies / Researcher in Gender and Security

FTGS Global Voices Seminar: ‘Thinking the Border Otherwise: Relationality, Survival and Abolition’ (06 July 2022, 2 pm-3 pm UK time)

RegistrationLink to Registration

Chair: Dr Amanda Chisholm, Senior Lecturer in Security Studies / Researcher in Gender and Security

Speaker: Dr Nivi Manchanda, Senior Lecturer in International Politics at Queen Mary, University of London. 

Dr Nivi Manchanda excavates the question of the border in the political thought of four foundational thinkers: Gloria Anzaldua, Temsula Ao, Jean Genet and Huey Newton. These scholars’ grapple with the border, albeit often obliquely, and posit an expansive conceptualisation of the border beyond its immediate material infrastructure.

Thinking the Border Otherwise offers a new and generative account of the processes of bordering whilst decentring the physical border as a ‘line on the map’. Specifically, by drawing on the vast archives of these scholar-activists, it reorients critical geography from a narrow focus on migration regimes and open borders towards more politically urgent and theoretically enriching engagements with memory and history vis-à-vis borders. It also brings into conversation four preeminent mid-twentieth century theorists whose writing and lives have compelling parallels, but have hitherto never been studied collectively.

About the speaker 

Dr Nivi Manchanda

Dr Nivi Manchanda is a Senior Lecturer in International Politics at Queen Mary, University of London. She is interested in questions of racism, empire, and borders and has published in, among other journals, International Affairs, Security Dialogue, Millennium, Current Sociology, and Third World Quarterly. She is the co-editor of Race and Racism in International Relations: Confronting the Global Colour Line (Routledge, 2014). Her monograph Imagining Afghanistan: the History and Politics of Imperial Knowledge (Cambridge University Press, 2020) was awarded the LHM Ling First Outstanding Book Prize by the British International Studies Association. She sits on the editorial board of International Studies Quarterly, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, and Security Dialogue. She was the co-editor in chief of the journal Politics from 2018 to 2021.

FTGS Global Voices Seminar Series

This event is part of the Feminist Theory and Gender Studies (FTGS) Global Voices Seminar Series. 

FTGS Global Voices Seminar (15 June 2022, 2 pm-3 pm UK time)

Please find below the details for the upcoming FTGS Global Voices seminar scheduled on Wednesday, 15 June 2022 (2 pm-3 pm/UK time).  

Registration: Online link here

Chair: Dr Amanda Chisholm, Senior Lecturer in Security Studies / Researcher in Gender and Security

Speaker: Dr Maria Tanyag, Fellow and Senior Lecturer at the Department of International Relations, Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, Australian National University

Discussant: Professor Shirin Rai, Department of Politics and International Studies and the Director of Warwick Interdisciplinary Research Centre for International Development (WICID).

At the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, health workers and women’s rights service providers worldwide experienced severe depletion and mortality rate. In many cases, they were even subjected to discrimination and vilified by their own governments and local communities. One of the most striking paradoxes of the COVID-19 pandemic is why at time when our collective need for care is most profound, that the very sources and providers of care were not only egregiously neglected but also assumed self-renewing. While clearly a global phenomenon, this pandemic paradox is even more perplexing in the case of the Philippines – a country whose competitive edge in the global labour market is built on nationalist quality of care.

This discussion Dr Maria Tanyag charts feminist explanations for the depletion of care in times of crisis by drawing on pandemic experiences in the Philippines. She presents preliminary evidence from an online survey and key-informant interviews with health workers and women’s rights service providers in the country. Learning from the perspectives of carers reveals important insights on the gendered logics of crisis defining who is owed care, when, how and why.

About the speaker 

Maria Tanyag

Dr Maria Tanyag is a Fellow and Senior Lecturer at the Department of International Relations, Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, Australian National University. She was awarded her PhD from Monash University in 2018. Maria received first class honours for both her MA (Research) and BA Honours in Political Studies from the University of Auckland, New Zealand; and a BA in Political Science magna cum laude from the University of the Philippines-Diliman. She was selected as one of the inaugural International Studies Association (ISA) Emerging Global South Scholars in 2019, and as resident Women, Peace and Security Fellow at Pacific Forum International (Hawaii) in 2021.

This seminar is part of the Feminist Theory and Gender Studies (FTGS) Global Voices Seminar Series. 

FTGS Global Voices Seminar Series